SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.42 issue3Dental fluorosis in primary dentition in an endemic hydrofluorosis areaIdentity and experience: a study of selected female physicians in five provincial states of Mexico author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Page  

Services on Demand

Journal

Article

Indicators

Related links

Share


Salud Pública de México

Print version ISSN 0036-3634

Abstract

CARRILLO-RODRIGUEZ, José G. et al. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in Mexico City. Salud pública Méx [online]. 2000, vol.42, n.3, pp.201-207. ISSN 0036-3634.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0036-36342000000300006.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the urban area of origin of patients and the prevalence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), induced by avian antigens. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study was conducted in 1999 at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (NIRD). Cases were 109 consecutive HP patients and controls were 184 patients: 39 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 63 with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), and 82 with asthma. Mexico City and surrounding counties (SC) were divided into 5 geographical areas: 1) Downtown; 2) North-East (NE); 3) South-East (SE); 4) North-West (NW) and 5) South-West (SW). Statistical analysis consisted of calculation of disease prevalence by urban area; associations were assessed with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate analysis with multiple logistic regression was performed to adjust for age, gender and socioeconomic level. RESULTS: Eighty HP cases were located in the NE southernmost and SE northernmost areas of Mexico City (48 and 32, respectively) (OR= 3.86; 95% CI 2.17-6.96). Thirty-six controls with asthma came from the SW area, (where NIRD is located) (p<0.05), and four from SC. Controls with PTB and IPF were scattered throughout the study area. CONCLUSIONS: The NE southernmost and SE northernmost areas were associated with HP. The cause of HP may not be geographical; a garbage dump used to be located in this area, suggesting that exposure to organic particles might contribute to the development of HP in susceptible individuals.

Keywords : bird fancier's lung; urban zones; organic particles; Mexico.

        · abstract in Spanish     · text in Spanish     · Spanish ( pdf )