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Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Print version ISSN 0042-9686

Abstract

BLAND, RM et al. Infant feeding counselling for HIV-infected and uninfected women: appropriateness of choice and practice. Bull World Health Organ [online]. 2007, vol.85, n.4, pp.289-296. ISSN 0042-9686.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0042-96862007000400014.

OBJECTIVE: To examine infant feeding intentions of HIV-infected and uninfected women and the appropriateness of their choices according to their home resources; and to determine their adherence to their intentions in the first postnatal week. METHODS: Feeding intentions of pregnant women were compared against four resources that facilitate replacement feeding: clean water, adequate fuel, access to a refrigerator and regular maternal income. First-week feeding practices were documented. FINDINGS: The antenatal feeding intentions of 1253 HIV-infected women were: exclusive breastfeeding 73%; replacement feeding 9%; undecided 18%. Three percent had access to all four resources, of whom 23% chose replacement feeding. Of those choosing replacement feeding, 8% had access to all four resources. A clean water supply and regular maternal income were independently associated with intention to replacement feed (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.2; AOR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.5, respectively). Significantly more HIV-infected women intending to exclusively breastfeed, rather than replacement feed, adhered to their intention in week one (exclusive breastfeeding 78%; replacement feeding 42%; P < 0.001). Of 1238 HIV-uninfected women, 82% intended to exclusively breastfeed; 2% to replacement feed; and 16% were undecided. Seventy-five percent who intended to exclusively breastfeed adhered to this intention postnatally, and only 11 infants (< 1%) received no breast milk. The number of antenatal home visits significantly influenced adherence to feeding intention. CONCLUSION: Most HIV-infected women did not have the resources for safe replacement feeding, instead choosing appropriately to exclusively breastfeed. Adherence to feeding intention among HIV-infected women was higher in those who chose to exclusively breastfeed than to replacement feed. With appropriate counselling and support, spillover of suboptimal feeding practices to HIV-negative women is minimal.

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